Header Artwork
Header Artwork

Whitepaper

WHITEPAPER

Considerations for Sterilization and Biocompatibility of 3D-Printed Orthopedic Devices

Download this whitepaper to learn about the various biocompatibility and sterilization considerations surrounding 3D-printed orthopedic devices.

3D-printed orthopedic medical devices are gaining attention and popularity due to their potential for enhanced biocompatibility, customizability, and cost-effectiveness.

As of late 2015, FDA had cleared more than 85 total 3D-printed medical devices, with more regulatory clearances on the horizon.

Thor Rollins

Thor Rollins

BS, RM (NRCM)
Toxicology and E&L Expert

Thor Rollins is a certified microbiologist and specializes in the selection and conduct of in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility tests. He actively speaks on biocompatibility related topics through Nelson Labs’ external seminars, webinars, and tradeshows. He presented on biocompatibility at the American College of Toxicology annual meeting in 2013 and has published many articles...

Martell Winters

Martell Winters

BS, RM/SM (NRCM), CISS-RAD
Scientific Competency Expert

Martell Winters is a specialist microbiologist (NRCM) and a radiation specialist (AAMI). He has been at Nelson Labs for 24 years and spent his earlier years working in the Radiation Sterilization group, responsible for bioburden testing and radiation validation studies. His specialties include microbiological process validation and radiation sterilization of medical devices, allograft tissue, and pharmaceutical products.

Matthew R Jorgensen, Ph.D.

Matthew R Jorgensen, Ph.D.

Chemistry and Materials Scientist

Dr. Jorgensen is an expert in chemistry and materials science. He has over a decade of experience designing, synthesizing, and analyzing complex materials. To characterize materials, Dr. Jorgensen has extensively used a wide variety of techniques including GC/MS, LC/MS, FTIR, UV/VIS, SEM, NMR, and several types of advanced spectroscopic techniques. His Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Utah was based on the fabrication and analysis of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide photonic crystals templated from the three-dimensional structure found in the exoskeleton of exotic weevils. During his time at the University of Utah, he received the Henry Eyring Research Fellowship, the DOW Chemical First Year Scholarship, and additional grants to travel and present his research at national and international conferences. His research has resulted in over 30 peer-reviewed publications.

Complete the following information to access the whitepaper